How to support our British dairy farmers

If you would like to support British dairy farmers then ...

  • Buy British  

Buy British milk. Buy British cream, butter, yoghurt, cheese and custard too. 

 Look out for the Red Tractor logo on dairy products

Look out for the Red Tractor logo on dairy products

  • Look out for the Red Tractor

Look out for the Red Tractor logo on all dairy products you buy. This stamp means they can be traced back to a British farm.

  • Pick your retailer

The Co-operative, Marks & Spencer, Sainsbury’s, Tesco and Waitrose are supporting farmers by paying them an increasingly fair and transparent price for milk. 

  • Make enquiries

Find someone at management level in the supermarket or shop and ask them where they source their dairy produce from and if they pay fair prices for it. Tell them you would like British goods. If you can, why not buy your dairy produce from the local farm shop or milk man, so it is easier to find out where it is from.

  • Spread the word

Share this story on social media as well as videos, posts, tweets and stories that will help raise awareness of the problem and how consumers can do their bit.

Edited from http://www.fwi.co.uk/business/5-simple-ways-to-support-british-dairy-farmers.htm 


Why are British dairy farmers in the news?
The price farmers receive for their milk has fallen by 24% in the last 12 months.

Why? It’s due to a supply and demand imbalance in the global marketplace, partly led by the Russian export ban on European dairy products and reduced demand from China. The result - a slump for commodity prices across the board. 

It costs farmers between 30p and 32p to produce one litre of milk.

They are currently being paid by processors between 19.69p and 32.93p per litre.

50% of the milk farmers produce is sold in to the liquid market. Less than 20% of the total is sold on supermarket shelves. 

The remainder is processed in to cheese, yoghurt and other dairy products. The wholesale prices paid for these products has also slumped, which in turn affects the price paid to farmers.

Dairy farmers are currently leaving the industry at a rate of one per day